History

Victorian Slum House
sassyjanegenealogy.com/victorian-sl… 

Genealogists experience the harsh living conditions of their ancestors in the slums of London in the mid- to late-19th century.

The True Story of Catherine the Great
smithsonianmag.com/history/true-sto… 

Hulu's "The Great" offers an irreverent, ahistorical take on the Russian empress' life. This is the real history behind the period comedy

Roman Finger Counting
tookmund.com/2020/05/roman-finger-c… 

I recently wrote a final paper on the history of written numerals. In the process, I discovered this fascinating tidbit that didn’t really fit in my paper, but I wanted to put it somewhere. So I’m writing about it here.

The History of the Hawaiian Shirt
smithsonianmag.com/innovation/histo… 

From kitsch to cool, ride the waves of undulating popularity of a tropical fashion statement

A brief history of medieval magic
historyextra.com/period/medieval/a-… 

From Narnia to Harry Potter, so many modern manifestations of magic come from the Middle Ages. Hetta Howes, who is writing a PhD at Queen Mary, University of London, investigates…

This World War II Bomber Took More Enemy Fire Than Most Others and Always Came Home
smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-inst… 

Seventy-five years after a memorable mission, the B26 bomber 'Flak-Bait' undergoes preservation at the National Air and Space Museum

Antoine Lavoisier
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antoine_Lavoi… 

Antoine Lavoisier (26 August 1743 – 8 May 1794), was a French nobleman and chemist who was central to the 18th-century chemical revolution and who had a large influence on both the history of chemistry and the history of biology. He is widely considered in popular literature as the "father of modern chemistry". Lavoisier's importance to science was expressed by Lagrange who lamented the beheading by saying: "Il ne leur a fallu qu'un moment pour faire tomber cette tête, et cent années peut-êt…

Catherine of Bosnia
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catherine_of_… 

Catherine of Bosnia (Bosnian: Katarina Kosača/Катарина Косача; 1424/1425 – 25 October 1478) was Queen of Bosnia as the wife of King Thomas, the penultimate Bosnian sovereign. She was born into the powerful House of Kosača, staunch supporters of the Bosnian Church. Her marriage in 1446 was arranged to bring peace between the King and her father, Stjepan Vukčić. The queenship of Catherine, who at that point embraced Roman Catholicism, was marked with an energetic construction of churches througho…

The Man in the Bottle
themagicdetective.com/2011/05/man-i… 

Carnegie The Magic Detective is a blog devoted to the history of magic and conjuring with an emphasis on Houdini.

How Winston Churchill Endured the Blitz—and Taught the People of England to Do the Same
smithsonianmag.com/history/how-wins… 

In a new book, best-selling author Erik Larson examines the determination of the ‘British Bulldog’ during England’s darkest hour

Life-changing first glimpse of a laser
news.stanford.edu/2019/11/19/life-c… 

Physicist Robert Byer worked on lasers when they were still just an interesting technology, never imagining their myriad modern uses.

Who Was Alexander von Humboldt?
smithsonianmag.com/smithsonian-inst… 

Smithsonian curator Eleanor Jones Harvey explains why this revolutionary 19th-century thought leader is due for a reconsideration

The Myth of 'Bloody Mary'
smithsonianmag.com/history/myth-blo… 

History remembers the English queen as a murderous monster, but the real story of Mary I is far more nuanced

Here be dragons
en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Here_be_drago… 

"Here be dragons" means dangerous or unexplored territories, in imitation of a medieval practice of putting illustrations of dragons, sea monsters and other mythological creatures on uncharted areas of maps where potential dangers were thought to exist.

This 7,000-year-old well is the oldest wooden structure ever discovered, archeologists say
ctvnews.ca/mobile/sci-tech/this-7-0… 

Archeologists have discovered a 7,000-year-old Neolithic well in eastern Europe, which they believe is the oldest wooden structure in the world. The well was built by farmers around 5256 B.C., researchers said. (University of Pardubice)

These 17th century monks did a beer fast for Lent
catholicnewsagency.com/news/these-1… 

They needed something other than water to sustain them, so the monks turned to a common staple of the time of their region – beer. They concocted an “unusually strong” brew, full of carbohydrates and nutrients, because “liquid bread wouldn’t break the fast,” Zuber noted.

Ancient Roman Valves
valvemagazine.com/web-only/categori… 

MuseumThe story of water supply in the ancient Roman Empire is grand. The transport and hydraulic control of large quantities of fresh water was one of the factors in the immense, unprecedented success of the Roman Empire.

How Presidents Have Communicated with the Public—From the Telegraph to Twitter
history.com/news/us-presidents-comm… 

From carefully staged speeches to radio to TV to Twitter, U.S. presidents have always leveraged the cutting edge to connect directly with voters.